SPLC - Manipulating the Press

A report issued in March, 2010, titled:

Immigration and the SPLC: How the Southern Poverty Law Center Invented a Smear, Served La Raza, Manipulated the Press, and Duped its Donors

concludes that:

...The success that Beck and FAIR had in harnessing that grass roots effort, which CIS research helped inform, put them in the cross hairs of the 'Stop the Hate' campaign.  The SPLC's campaign of distortion, smear, and character assassination, has become a central part of the campaign. 

Conducted in the name of tolerance, civility and good governance, that campaign is itself intolerant, uncivil, and extremist.  In the name of defending democracy, it seeks to stifle one of democracy's most vital functions, the vigorous discussion of important public issues.  It demonstrates that the Southern Poverty Law Center has become a peddler of its own brand of self-righteous hate.  It is a center of intolerance, marked by a poverty of ideas, a dependence on dishonesty, and a lack of fundamental decency."

 

After the collapse of the Senate amnesty bill in 2007, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) joined with the National Council of La Raza [translates as "The Race"] and others to launch a campaign to smear the three largest mainstream groups making a case for tighter enforcement and lower immigration. 

At the center of this campaign was the designation of the Federation for American Immigration Reform as a "hate group" and the spread of that taint to Numbers USA and the Center for Immigration Studies. The announced goal was to pressure journalists and policymakers not to meet or speak with these organizations. Touted as an effort to 'stop the hate,' it was a thinly disguised move to stifle debate. 

The Center for Immigration Studies has released a new report examining the SPLC and its role in this campaign:

'Immigration and the SPLC: How the Southern Poverty Law Center Invented a Smear, Served La Raza, Manipulated the Press, and Duped its Donors,' authored by Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Jerry Kammer, now a Senior Research Fellow at CIS.

Among the findings: